Tag Archives: Bonhoeffer

Remembrance Day in the Church

In 1932, Dietrich Bonhoeffer preached in Berlin on Volkstrauertag—the German equivalent to Remembrance Day in Canada.  Interestingly, one of his main emphases throughout the sermon is that the way Memorial Day is observed in the church should differ from the way that is observed in other contexts.  I made a similar point in a 2013 article entitled, “Remembering Rightly: The Pastoral Dilemma of Remembrance Day,” although I can’t recall if I had read Bonhoeffer’s 1932 sermon at the time I wrote it. Continue reading Remembrance Day in the Church

Ring in the New Year with Bonhoeffer

For those who have been living with the guilt of a string of broken New Year’s resolutions to study the work of Dietrich Bonhoeffer, 2018 may be your year to break the slide! Starting on January 2, 2018, I will be teaching a five-day intensive intercession course on “The Life and Thought of Dietrich Bonhoeffer” at Tyndale Seminary. Here’s the course description to whet your appetite: Continue reading Ring in the New Year with Bonhoeffer

The Road to Calvary Passes through Flossenbürg

A Guest Post by Patrick Franklin

This is the tenth  in a series of posts engaging with the sermons in Leaps of Faith: Sermons from the Edge.  This post is a reflection upon a Lenten sermon entitled “The Road to Calvary Passes through Flossenbürg” (pp. 92-102). The Scriptural text for the sermon was Mark 8:27-9:8. Continue reading The Road to Calvary Passes through Flossenbürg

Theology as Thinking After

Last night, I kicked off my winter semester “Systematic Theology I” course at Tyndale Seminary.  It seems like a quite wonderful group of students called together from a wide cross-section of locales, denominational backgrounds, and life experiences.  Some of the ground I covered last night reminded me of the inaugural post I wrote for this blog a little over a year ago. Since it was posted before things really got rolling on the blog and because it might be of interest to my newest batch of students, I thought I’d re-post a large excerpt from that first post.  The original post was entitled, “Beginning in the Middle.”
Continue reading Theology as Thinking After

The Truth Will Set You Free

As the dust settles following last Monday’s initial United States Presidential debate, I took the opportunity yesterday to preach on the question of “What does it mean to tell the truth?”  I suggested that for Christians telling the truth is inseparable from becoming truthful people, as we find ourselves caught up by the Spirit in the life of Jesus, who is the Truth.  For this reason, the Christian tradition has held a special place for the martyrs.  The martyrs are those who have borne witness to the truth at the cost of their lives.  Although I didn’t explicitly make the connection, a member of the congregation observed that the sermon implicitly contrasted the richness of the faithful witness of Dietrich Bonhoeffer and Maximilian Kolbe with the poverty of the two presidential candidates. Continue reading The Truth Will Set You Free