Category Archives: Books

Thank You for Making “Minding the Web” the Top Seller in Christian Ethics

Amazon’s Bestsellers in Christian Ethics

Thank you to all my friends and supporters who have helped to make Minding the Web the top selling book in Canada on Amazon in the category of Christian Ethics.  For those who have not yet acquired a copy, the special sale price on the Kindle version of the book is available for one more day.  Be sure to tell your friends!

Flash Sale on “Minding the Web”

Minding the Web: Making Theological Connections is being featured by Wipf and Stock this week as part of an October ebook flash sale.  Readers in the United States can get a hold of the Kindle version for under $3 here.  Canadian readers can purchase the Kindle version for under $4 here.  The offer expires on Friday, so you’ll need to move quickly!

American Protestant Gnosticism

I’ve been revisiting Philip J. Lee’s incisive study Against the Protestant Gnostics (New York: Oxford University Press, 1987) in anticipation of lecturing on the life and work of the second century Church Father Irenaeus.  Lee’s diagnosis of Protestant Gnosticism seems just as apt in 2019 as when he first published the book some thirty years ago.  Here’s a few quotes from a chapter entitled, “Results of a Gnosticized Protestantism” that caught my attention. Continue reading American Protestant Gnosticism

America’s and Niverville’s Best Theologians

I was caught by surprise this morning when upon opening the town newspaper, the Niverville Citizen, I was confronted by my own face and that of Stanley Hauerwas staring back up at me.  The article fittingly appears directly above a piece on the “Bear-y Holiday Musical” staged by the local elementary school, in which my kids participated.  You can read the full article here. Continue reading America’s and Niverville’s Best Theologians

A Poor Church-Growth Strategy? (Series on “Minding the Web”)

“That we are taught to confess our sin, particularly during Lent, is not something to which we look forward. We are not at all sure an emphasis on sin is a good idea. We are in a time of a dramatic loss in membership in mainline Protestantism. We need to attract new people. Telling people they are possessed by sin does not sound like a good church-growth strategy. Continue reading A Poor Church-Growth Strategy? (Series on “Minding the Web”)